Cub reporters

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By Jason Kaplan Helen Bunt, director of the Butterhill Day School summer program, holds up a photocopy of the original firehouse for Highland Engine Company, now the home of J. Ferrara Photography. Some of the campers walked around with a pen and small notepad pretending to be reporters on the street. Their job was to write down what historic buildings they saw and how they’re be used today. The information, along with up-to-date photos were to be posted on the wall inside the school dedicated to the history of Cornwall.

By Jason Kaplan
Helen Bunt, director of the Butterhill Day School summer program, holds up a photocopy of the original firehouse for Highland Engine Company, now the home of J. Ferrara Photography. Some of the campers walked around with a pen and small notepad pretending to be reporters on the street. Their job was to write down what historic buildings they saw and how they’re being used today. The information, along with up-to-date photos were to be posted on the wall inside the school dedicated to the history of Cornwall.

Dr. Sheboy returns to Palaia stage

Dr. Frank Sheboy is no longer a Cornwall high school principal, but he’s still connected to the community. He’s part of a local cast that will be performing at Palaia Vineyards next weekend.

They’re presenting “Fools,” a Neil Simon comedy about a Russian village that has been cursed with ignorance. No one has escaped the curse — not even Dr. Sheboy, who is playing Slovitch the Butcher.

Director Rich Aufiero, the head of the Cornwall Drama Club, recruited Dr. Sheboy for the part and told him not to use an eastern European accent. So the former principal decided to talk like one of the Bowery Boys. And he sounds surprisingly natural for someone who grew up in Ohio and graduated from the Goshen School District (where he is now an assistant superintendent).

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The local camp you might not know

Photo by Ken Cashman Each age group adopted the name of a mythological god, and then used the camp computers to learn about the god, create a poster, and write a rap song. On July 19, the campers sang their songs before lunch.

Photo by Ken Cashman
Each age group adopted the name of a mythological god, and then used the camp computers to learn about the god, create a poster, and write a rap song. On July 19, the campers sang their songs before lunch.

It has a pool, ball fields and hiking trails like other camps. Local Scouts have held events at Camp Olmsted. And students from Cornwall-on-Hudson have visited to climb the ropes and ride the zip line. In the off-season, adults have stayed at the guest house for retreats or conventions.

The site is beautiful. But to really appreciate the place, you have to see it in the summer when it’s filled with campers. Olmsted has a distinct personality that makes even lunch time unique.

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Lamb named interim headmaster at Storm King School

photo by Jason Kaplan At the beginning of the month, Jonathan Lamb took over as interim headmaster of Storm King School, succeeding Paul Domingue. Lamb had served as assistant headmaster for four years.

photo by Jason Kaplan
At the beginning of the month, Jonathan Lamb took over as interim headmaster of Storm King School, succeeding Paul Domingue. Lamb had served as assistant headmaster for four years.

The Storm King School Board of Trustees accepted the resignation of two-year headmaster Paul Domingue, effective June 30. Assistant Head of School, Jonathan Lamb, has assumed the role of interim head for the 2014-15 school year effective July 1.

Lamb grew up in Grand Island in western New York. Upon graduating from high school, he spent a year of natural, academic, and wilderness study using Maine as a classroom. He joined a program called Maine Reach where he took wilderness trips, studied issues related to nature, and participated in an internship as a teacher.

He worked in an elementary school in Brunswick, Maine for just a month, but it was enough to get the teen excited about teaching and education.

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This week’s issue – July 25, 2014

Photo by Jason Kaplan A replica of the Pinta was one of Christopher Columbus’  ships docked at the Newburgh riverfront last weekend. The ship, along with the NIna, were open to walking tours by the public. Members of the media were treated to a river tour aboard the Nina on July 17.

Photo by Jason Kaplan
A replica of the Pinta was one of Christopher Columbus’ ships docked at the Newburgh riverfront last weekend. The ship, along with the NIna, was open to walking tours by the public. Members of the media were treated to a river tour aboard the Nina on July 17.

Replica ships dock in Newburgh

People visiting the Newburgh riverfront last week took a trip back to the 15th century when Christopher Columbus was crossing the Atlantic.

On Thursday, July 11, the Nina and Pinta, replicas of Columbus’ ships, docked at the riverfront. The ships opened Friday for walking tours by the general public. Members of the media, and other invited guests, were treated to an hour tour on the Hudson aboard the Nina. Page 1A

BFF to be ready when school opens

School opens on Sept. 3, and the volunteers at BFF expect to be ready. They’ll be providing weekend food for elementary school students who receive free lunches during the week.

“We’re definitely going to make it happen,” Sally Mattausch said on July 18. She’s a co-chair of BFF, which stands for “Backpack Food for Fridays.” She has a reason to be optimistic; the group has been making progress. Page 1A

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Where’s Mom?

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Photo by Suzanne Tagliaferro What’s under the typical porch? You wouldn’t expect to see a bird’s nest. But that’s what an inquisitive homeowner found after hearing mysterious noises underneath the house.

Photo by Suzanne Tagliaferro
What’s under the typical porch? You wouldn’t expect to see a bird’s nest. But that’s what an inquisitive homeowner found after hearing mysterious noises underneath the house.

Schools renovating energy systems

Photo by Ken Cashman Workers dug up fuel tanks during the first week of July as the school district prepared to change its heating systems from fuel oil to natural gas

Photo by Ken Cashman
Workers dug up fuel tanks during the first week of July as the school district prepared to change its heating systems from fuel oil to natural gas

Students may not realize that summer vacation is a week shorter than in the past. But Walter Moran knows it. As the superintendent of facilities, he has just 60 days to oversee a complete renovation of the school district’s energy system.

Back in April, the State Education Department approved a New York Power Authority (NYPA) plan to make Cornwall more energy efficient. That left a narrow window to get bids and line up contractors, so that work could begin as soon as the school year was finished.

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