Seniors to receive cook-chill meals

Photo by Jason Kaplan Kathy Gadbois, Tim Dempsey, and Frank Porcaro prepare senior meals at Munger Cottage. Later this year, meals will be prepared in a centralized location and then chilled. Meals will be re-heated at Munger Cottage.

Photo by Jason Kaplan
Kathy Gadbois, Tim Dempsey, and Frank Porcaro prepare senior meals at Munger Cottage. Later this year, meals will be prepared in a centralized location and then chilled. Meals will be re-heated at Munger Cottage.

Changes will be coming, later this year, in the way senior citizens receive their hot lunches, but they likely won’t notice a difference in the quality of the food. Rather than receive hot meals prepared fresh that day in the Munger Cottage kitchen, seniors will soon be feeding on cook-chill meals which will be prepared ahead of time in a central kitchen, and then reheated locally.

“Cook-chill is a method to prepare large quantities of meals while maintaining nutrient density through freezing,” said Ann Marie Maglione, director of the Orange County Office for the Aging. “The food will be cooked in large batches with new equipment then quickly chilled to frozen so that it retains freshness upon defrosting, and the nutrients normally destroyed in the freezing process remain. Office for the Aging (OFA) staff currently serves a hot meal which, if it is not served to the client within two hours, must be discarded in accordance with Health Department regulations.”

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Blaine enters Hall of Fame

Don Blaine

Don Blaine

“Is there anyone left in Cornwall?” the gentleman in the hotel lobby asked. He was handing out table assignments for the induction dinner for the National Wrestling Hall of Fame.

Cornwall wrestling coach Don Blaine was one of the inductees, and about 70 people traveled to Syracuse to see him get the honor.

When it was time for the presentations, David Blaine stepped to the microphone. Alluding to the magician with the same name, he apologized for not doing any tricks. David then introduced the new Hall-of-Famer, and said that he was lucky to have him as both a father and a coach.

“I didn’t write his speech,” Coach Blaine assured the audience when it was his turn to speak. The large crowd laughed. The coach crammed a lot of “thank yous” into the five minutes he was allotted.

He managed to get a few more chuckles before he sat down. He introduced his future daughter-in-law, Jennifer Nusio, and when people applauded, he told them that the Blaine-Nusio wedding fund was getting low. He also referred to the crowd from Cornwall, and refuted the rumor that he had chartered a bus.

It’s hard to define a person’s impact on a sport or a community. A coach’s victory totals and number of champions don’t tell the whole story. The man in the hotel lobby offered a much better measure. He said that in the long history of the event, he had never seen so many people show up to honor one individual.

Obituary – September 26, 2014

Edgar Hembree Jr.

December 2, 1957-September 19, 2014

Edgar  Hembree Jr, of New Windsor  entered into eternal rest on Sept. 19 at St. Luke’s Cornwall Hospital in Newburgh. He was 56 years old.

The son of Edgar Hembree Sr. and Deanna Potter Hembree, Edgar  was born on Dec. 2, 1957 in Cornwall..He  was a long time Filter Plant Operator  for the Village of Cornwall-on-Hudson Water Department.

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This week’s issue – September 26, 2014

Photo by Jason Kaplan About a dozen biology students from Storm King School were invited to Black Rock Forest, on Sept. 18, to help remove Japanese Angelica Tree, an invasive species.

Photo by Jason Kaplan
About a dozen biology students from Storm King School were invited to Black Rock Forest, on Sept. 18, to help remove Japanese Angelica Tree, an invasive species.

Invasive species found in Black Rock Forest

An invasive species is one that occupies and then takes over an area because native species don’t recognize it as a food source or a potential place to live. Unless something is done to control its spread, the species will grow quickly and dominate an area. When the Black Rock Forest Consortium discovered three such species, officials responded immediately to remove the threat in order to maintain the integrity of the woodlands. Page 1A

Library sets bond referendum date

The School Board passed a resolution on Sept. 22 that will allow the library to hold a referendum on its renovation project. The balloting will take place in the library on Tuesday, Nov. 18 from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Voters will have a chance to say “yes” or “no” to a $3.68 million bond that would cover the cost of repairs, renovation and expansion. Page 1A

Rescuers hoist two hikers off a cliff

The Cornwall Fire Department Rescue Team was able to get two young hikers off a cliff on Saturday evening. They had reached a point where they couldn’t go up and couldn’t get down.

The department received word at 7:15 p.m. that seven young hikers were lost in Low Point Park. As the team arrived and got ready for the rescue, five members of the party came out of the woods. One of them had been injured by a falling rock, and required medical attention. Page 1A

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Military academy makes historic appointment

Lt. Col. Samantha Ross

Lt. Col. Samantha Ross

NYMA cadets met their new commandant on Sept. 15. Anthony Desa, the president of the Board of Trustees, introduced the new officer at a 10-minute meeting in the chapel. He reported that she was the first female commandant in the school’s 125-year history.

The new commandant, Lt. Col. Samantha Ross, had been standing in a corner of the upstairs sanctuary. After she was introduced, she joined Mr. Desa on the stage, and addressed the audience.

“The best place to make a difference,” she told the cadets, “is in the lives of young people. Being in high school can be tough,” she added, “and it’s tougher for you because you’re away from home.”

In her most recent assignment, Lt. Col. Ross was a professor of military science at West Point. She joins a staff that is headed by Maj. Gen. William Beard, the school’s superintendent.

At the Monday morning meeting, Mr. Desa shared some other information with the cadets and faculty. The pools have been opened, he said, and the horses are back in the stables. The academy has reinstated the riding program after it was discontinued for a year.

In December, the school will accept 125 Korean students, who will be on campus for three months. The same students will be returning to NYMA in the summer.

At the end of the meeting, after the cadets had been dismissed, Mr. Desa reported that NYMA would be hosting a three-day festival from Oct. 17 to Oct. 19. The event, which coincides with alumni weekend, will be open to the public. It will include rides, food and fireworks.

Schmidt reprises role on cable series

Kenneth Schmidt

Kenneth Schmidt

Cornwall-on-Hudson Trustee Kenneth Schmidt is hoping to see more than his shoulder when an episode of “A Crime to Remember” airs later this year. For the second time, Schmidt appears as an extra in the Investigation Discovery series.

Last year, Schmidt, a retired principal from Cornwall-on-Hudson Elementary School, replied to an ad in the paper for extras in a new crime series that focuses on real-life murder cases of the ‘50s and ‘60s. He received a call back and rehearsed scenes for an episode titled, “Enter the Monster.”  Schmidt played a state trooper, but only his shoulder made the final cut.

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Anthem anniversary and questions

Photo by Ken Cashman Middle school students gathered outside on Sept. 12 to sing the National Anthem.

Photo by Ken Cashman
Middle school students gathered outside on Sept. 12 to sing the National Anthem.

On the Friday closest to Sept. 14, Cornwall middle school students leave the building at 9 a.m. and gather at the flag pole to observe the anniversary of the “Star Spangled Banner.”

They’ve been doing it for 11 years under the direction of music teacher Valerie Ransbottom. Before the kids sang the anthem this year, they warmed up by chanting “Many maniacal monks mumble mercilessly.”

“It helps them move the sound forward,” Mrs. Ransbottom explained in an e-mail. The lyrics for “The Star Spangled Banner” were written 200 years ago. How much do you know about them?

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This week’s issue – September 19, 2014

Photo by Ken Cashman The Cornwall Central School District has no immediate plans to repair the Denniston House, which sits on the property adjacent to the high school. Concerned residents would like to see the historic home repaired before it falls apart completely.

Photo by Ken Cashman
The Cornwall Central School District has no immediate plans to repair the Denniston House, which sits on the property adjacent to the high school. Concerned residents would like to see the historic home repaired before it falls apart completely.

Degradation of Denniston House continues

As the interior of a historic home continues to deteriorate, two residents, Ray Torraca  and Dean Satterly, presented their concerns to  Cornwall’s Board of Education at its Sept. 8 meeting.

Those who have driven west on Route 94 may have noticed a boarded up stone house near the corner of Dragon Drive. Page 1A

Alarming statements rock school

On Sept. 9, Cornwall Central High School Principal Lynn Imperato called the Town of Cornwall Police to report a student making alarming statements. Police Chief Todd Hazard responded to the call and began an investigation at the high school.

Rumors were rampant by the following evening. Mrs. Imperato referred to them in an e-mail addressed to the parents of high school students. But she couldn’t tell them much, because of the investigation and the need to protect the rights of a juvenile. Page 1A

Some groups to pay to use Munger

The Town Board is close to adopting a policy, where certain groups will have to pay for the use of Munger Cottage.

Earlier in the month, Town Clerk Renata McGee suggested a charge of $25 per use, starting in January 2015. “We are looking for revenue,” she said at a Sept. 8 Town Board meeting. “Are we going to ask the taxpayers? Why not ask the people who use the building?” Page 1A

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