Surfing the slopes

Photo by Jason Kaplan Winter storm Niko dumped a foot of snow last week and rewarded students with a four-day weekend. The local kids took advantage of the extra day off, Friday, by hitting the slope at Storm King Golf Club. Some rode traditional sleds while others used snow boards to speed their way to the bottom.

Photo by Jason Kaplan
Winter storm Niko dumped a foot of snow last week and rewarded students with a four-day weekend. The local kids took advantage of the extra day off, Friday, by hitting the slope at Storm King Golf Club. Some rode traditional sleds while others used snow boards to speed their way to the bottom.

Jordan Bell the youngest Republican honoree

Jordan Bel

Jordan Bel

You would expect the Orange County Young Republican of the Year to be young. But Jordan Bell would surprise you. He’s being honored at Temple Hill Tavern on Feb. 22.

Jordan’s foray into politics began last summer when he called Sen. Larkin’s office and said he’d love to get involved. “Where do you go to school?” he was asked. When Jordan said “Cornwall” the person on the other end was surprised. He assumed he was talking to a college student.

That’s what’s newsworthy about Jordan’s selection. He’s the youngest person to ever receive the award. His interest in politics started with the 2008 Presidential election. By middle school, he was reading the news every day. In high school, he was elected class president four years in a row.

A few weeks after his phone call, Jordan met Sen. Larkin and other members of his staff. “They made me feel like one of them,” Jordan recalled. “I was a volunteer but I felt like someone who was getting paid.”

Jordan became the Director of Outreach for the re-election campaign. Using a computer system, he dialed thousands of potential voters. Some hung up. But others had positive things to say about the candidate.

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Washington’s HQ acquires work of a “beloved” artist

Photo by Ken Cashman Newburgh historian Mary McTamaney applauds after the unveiling of a 1909 painting by C.K. Chatterton. The art, a gift from Mr. Chatterton’s granddaughters, is now on display at Washington’s Headquarters.

Photo by Ken Cashman
Newburgh historian Mary McTamaney applauds after the unveiling of a 1909 painting by C.K. Chatterton. The art, a gift from Mr. Chatterton’s granddaughters, is now on display at Washington’s Headquarters.

Can you love an artist you never met? City of Newburgh Historian Mary McTamaney professed a love for Clarence K. Chatterton (1880-1973) before the unveiling of one of his paintings at Washington’s Headquarters.

The historic site looked its best on Feb. 10 — the snow-covered lawn providing a sharp contrast to the blue of the Hudson River. Inside the museum, twenty people gathered to welcome the new acquisition, a gift from Mr. Chatterton’s granddaughters.

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Obituaries – February 17, 2017

Dolores A. Biddiscombe

January 25, 1936-February 6, 2017

Cornwall

Dolores A. Biddiscombe, of Cornwall entered into eternal rest on Feb. 6 at St. Luke’s Cornwall Hospital in Newburgh.  She was 81 years old.

The daughter of Martin William Kuhl and Madeleine Hager Kuhl, she was born on Jan. 25, 1936 in the Bronx.

Dolores retired as an Admissions Clerk for Cornwall Hospital after many years of dedicated service. She went out of her way to welcome and comfort patients as they entered for care and always greeted them with a warm smile.

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Trees cleared for construction

Photo by Jason Kaplan A large area of trees, on Forge Hill Road near the bridge, have been cleared to make way for a water filtration plant for New Windsor’s new wells. The project is in response to the eventual shut-down of the New York City Aqueduct. The construction site is along the Moodna Creek, which can be seen in the background.

Photo by Jason Kaplan
A large area of trees, on Forge Hill Road near the bridge, have been cleared to make way for a water filtration plant for New Windsor’s new wells. The project is in response to the eventual shut-down of the New York City Aqueduct. The construction site is along the Moodna Creek, which can be seen in the background.

Teens create a carnival at the library

Luishmel Reyes uses cotton balls to make a snowman during the Cornwall Public Library’s winter carnival.

Luishmel Reyes uses cotton balls to make a snowman during the Cornwall Public Library’s winter carnival.

Saturday started as the coldest day of the year and some might say it was too cold to enjoy a winter carnival, but not if it was indoors, in the confines of the Cornwall Public Library.

The event, organized by the library’s teen volunteers, attracted well over 100 parents and children in the first hour. Shortly after the carnival was scheduled to commence, not a parking spot could be found. Inside the community room, there was little space to maneuver to the various stations.

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Nature museum exhibits meant to be touched

Abigail Baisley (seated) and Devon Hard worked together to produce this vastly enlarged image of a bird feather. The girls were at the Wildlife Education Center on Jan. 28 for the opening of a new exhibit.

Abigail Baisley (seated) and Devon Hard worked together to produce this vastly enlarged image of a bird feather. The girls were at the Wildlife Education Center on Jan. 28 for the opening of a new exhibit.

“If you can reach it, you can touch it,” Emily Nestlerode told the crowd at the Wildlife Education Center. They had come on Jan. 28 for the opening of the new Birds on the Wing exhibit — the first Ms. Nestlerode had arranged for the museum. Her goal was to have plenty of things for kids to do.

She spoke at a brief ribbon cutting ceremony, which included board president Susan Christensen and executive director Jackie Grant. Once the ribbon was snipped, adults helped themselves to champagne and cheese, while the kids took Ms. Nestlerode’s advice and looked for things they could touch.

Abigail Baisley and Devon Hard hadn’t met before, but they had no problem working together at a powerful magnifying device. They slid a bird feather into a slot in the machine, and saw the feather greatly enlarged on a screen above them.

A few youngsters took turns at the nest building table. And a few people, who were no longer kids, pushed buttons to hear the warning cries of different species.

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