Town Board OKs preliminary budget

The DEC has pushed back the dealine for Phase I of the upgrade of the Town’s sewage treatment plant.

The DEC has pushed back the deadline for Phase I of the upgrade of the Town’s sewage treatment plant.

At an Oct. 13 workshop, the Town Board accepted a preliminary budget that is under the tax levy cap. The board will hold a public hearing on the budget at 7 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 7. Copies are available in the Town Clerk’s office.

-In other news, the board extended COVAC’s contract until the end of the year. The supervisor and deputy supervisor had submitted a proposal to the ambulance corps, where it would become independent on June 1, 2017.

Continue Reading

EmailShare/Bookmark

Hunters aim to thwart zombie take-over

Photo by Jay LeRoy The third annual zombie walk will take place at the Cornwall Volunteer Ambulance Corps bay. Hunters will try to “capture” the zombies attempting to take over the town.

Photo by Jay LeRoy
The third annual zombie walk will take place at the Cornwall Volunteer Ambulance Corps bay. Hunters will try to “capture” the zombies attempting to take over the town.

The zombie invasion is coming to Cornwall – again. The undead have rallied their troops in preparation for another takeover attempt and it will once again be up to the hunters to save the town from peril.

On Oct. 22, from 5 to 9 p.m., Cornwall High School student Abigail Moore will conduct her third annual zombie event.

Continue Reading

Local candidates each win a primary

Lisa LaGrutta (right) showed up at Munger Cottage to see if she was eligible to vote in the Sept. 13 primary.

Lisa LaGrutta (right) showed up at Munger Cottage to see if she was eligible to vote in the Sept. 13 primary.

Michael O’Connor and incumbent Lynn Beesecker each picked up a line in their race for Town Justice.

Mr. O’Connor won the Conservative primary 17-13, while Judge Beesecker prevailed in the Independence Party race 30-27.

With a small turnout expected, Munger Cottage was the only polling site in Cornwall. About half the people who showed up there weren’t eligible to vote in the Sept. 13 primary, which was limited to members of the Conservative, Independence, Green, Working Family and Women’s Equality Parties.

Continue Reading

Patriot Day speakers avoid repetition

Representatives of Gym Kids placed a wreath at the Ken Kumpel 9-11 Monument at Chadeayne Circle.

Representatives of Gym Kids placed a wreath at the Ken Kumpel 9-11 Monument at Chadeayne Circle.

Another large crowd showed up for the Patriots Day observance at Chadeayne Circle. The challenge for the speakers was to be relevant without repeating what they had said in the past.

That wasn’t a problem for Susan Kamlet. The president of the historical society was addressing the gathering for the first time. As a young adult, she had witnessed history through the eyes of her grandfather, who remembered the Wright Brothers’ flight and Lindbergh’s crossing the Atlantic.

Continue Reading

Hermine helps chamber’s 1st car show

IN THE DRIVER’S SEAT: Ryan LaPolla got to turn the wheel and press the horn of a Model T Ford.

IN THE DRIVER’S SEAT: Ryan LaPolla got to turn the wheel and press the horn of a Model T Ford.

“We pulled it off,” a smiling Joe Dvash said on Sunday afternoon, Sept. 4. The Chamber of Commerce vice president was pleased with the success of the car show and happy that the weather didn’t spoil it.

The car show wasn’t a rain or shine event. Several of the vintage automobile owners said they wouldn’t show up if there was a 20 percent chance of precipitation. Couple that with the threat of side effects from Hurricane Hermine and you can see why Mr. Dvash and the other organizers would be uneasy.

Continue Reading

Cornwall car show to benefit police

Photo contributed Saturday Night Cruisers Car Club will bring its car show to Cornwall on Sunday, Sept. 4.  The event will help raise money for the local police departments.

Photo contributed
Saturday Night Cruisers Car Club will bring its car show to Cornwall on Sunday, Sept. 4. The event will help raise money for the local police departments.

Aficionados, get your engines started. On Sunday, Sept. 4, from 2 to 6 p.m., the Saturday Night Cruisers Car Club will be hosting its first car show in Cornwall. Sponsored by the Greater Cornwall Chamber of Commerce, the event will benefit the town and village police departments. The rain date is Sept. 5.

Chamber vice president Joseph Dvash took the lead on organizing the car show along with members Stacey Lyle and Luann Richards.

Continue Reading

Tots show talent at “Music in the Park”

Photo by Ken Cashman Ilaria Bergonzi (left) and Alayna Kane kept time to the music and kept spectators entertained on a Sunday night.

Photo by Ken Cashman
Ilaria Bergonzi (left) and Alayna Kane kept time to the music and kept spectators entertained on a Sunday night.

The youngest members of the audience put on their own show on Sunday evening, Aug. 7.  Ilaria Bergonzi and Alayna Kane couldn’t reach double digits if they added their ages together. But that didn’t stop them from dancing at the Music in the Park Concert in front of Town Hall.

Ilaria, the smaller of the two, moved up and down in time to the music. Alayna swayed from side to side. The youngsters enjoyed themselves without noticing the spectators who were watching them — a group that included Supervisor Richard Randazzo and Deputy Supervisor Helen Bunt.

The guitar and percussion team of Teatum and Battiato provided the music for a crowd of 115 people, who escaped the heat of the evening by placing their lawn chairs in the shade. As a result, there was a stretch of open field between the musicians and the fans. Ilaria and Alayna were in front, where most everyone could see them.

On previous nights, there have been other attractions. “We’ve had a couple of really good sunsets,” Stacey Lyle observed on the morning after the tots’ performance. As the secretary of the Greater Cornwall Chamber of Commerce, she’s been at every event.

Continue Reading

Town gains allies in its fight for a light

Rodney Bednarek focuses on the Town Board as Jim McGee (standing behind him) reads a letter from Sen. Bill Larkin.

Rodney Bednarek focuses on the Town Board as Jim McGee (standing behind him) reads a letter from Sen. Bill Larkin.

The Town Board has picked up allies in its bid to have a traffic light at the intersection of Jackson Avenue and Route 94. Letters of support have come from West Point Tours (the bus company that transports Cornwall students) and from Supt. of Schools Neal Miller. He suggests that, with the high school in the area, there are many new drivers passing through the intersection.

The letters will go to the Department of Transportation (DOT) along with a Town Board resolution and a petition with more than 1,000 signatures. Erin Talarico started the petition in July after being injured in an accident involving three vehicles.

Continue Reading

Student adds bee houses to Black Rock Forest

Contributed photo Catherine and Mary Tighe (center and right) helped Elizabeth Klosky mount her bee houses in Black Rock Forest.

Contributed photo
Catherine and Mary Tighe (center and right) helped Elizabeth Klosky mount her bee houses in Black Rock Forest.

When it comes to bees, Elizabeth Klosky can be very persuasive.

A year ago the Cornwall high school student convinced Assemblyman James Skoufis to don a white protective suit so he could get a close look at the family hives.

Elizabeth had an ulterior motive. She was hoping New York would adopt a program that has flourished in Virginia, where the state has subsidized new beekeepers.

The bee population has declined in recent years, and Elizabeth is trying to reverse the trend. It’s her gold project for Girl Scouts, and it’s also something she wants to accomplish.

Continue Reading

Kids learn to become young investigators

Photo by Jason Kaplan Thom Jones, a foresnsic science instructor, gave a presentaton at the Cornwall Public Library last week. One of the exercises was to dust for prints on a CD.

Photo by Jason Kaplan
Thom Jones, a foresnsic science instructor, gave a presentaton at the Cornwall Public Library last week. One of the exercises was to dust for prints on a CD.

Forensic science isn’t used just to solve criminal cases; last week, about 18 children got to see how evidence is collected at a crime scene.
Thom Jones, a former attorney and now a forensic science instructor at SUNY Empire State College, visited the Cornwall Public Library, to teach the kids about fingerprints.

Each person is born with different fingerprints. It’s what makes us unique. Fingerprints are formed 10 weeks into pregnancy, which means even identical twins aren’t exactly the same.

Many factors contribute to the appearance of one’s prints including mother’s health during pregnancy, the environment, and later in life, a person’s job. As one grows, fingerprints get larger and eventually lines will form across them caused by dry skin and doing the same tasks over and over again. Certain medication could also affect one’s fingerprints.

There are three main types of fingerprints. Loops are the most common and look like bananas with a triangle underneath. Whirls are the second most common and can look like targets or spirals. The third most common are arches, looking like a little hill or a steep hill. Other types include double loop, central pocket loop, or accidental, meaning they don’t fit any pattern.

Continue Reading