Farmers Market prepared for the great outdoors

File photo The Cornwall’s summer farmers market returns at 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, June 7, in front of Town Hall.

File photo
The summer edition of the Cornwall farmers market returns at 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, June 7, in front of Town Hall.

This Saturday marks the last day of the seasonal farmers market, but additional opportunities to purchase fresh produce and other foods are just around the corner.

Weather permitting, Saturday’s market will be outdoors from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Munger Cottage. It will serve as a prelude to the summer farmers market which will run from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. starting on the first Wednesday in June through the last Wednesday in September. There will be no market on July 5, the day after Independence Day, and Sept. 6, the first day of school. The market will be set up on the lawn of Town Hall.

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One big difference in this year’s Sunrise Service

Rev. Tricia Calahan delivered the message at the Easter Sunrise Service at Ring’s Pond. The morning was unseasonably warm.

Rev. Tricia Calahan delivered the message at the Easter Sunrise Service at Ring’s Pond. The morning was unseasonably warm.

With one exception, the Easter morning rites at Ring’s Pond were like the Sunrise Services in the past. The same clergy officiated. The same musicians accompanied the hymns on their guitars. And, as usual, a pink stuffed bunny was perched at their feet.

Many of the worshipers were regulars. They arrived early because there was daylight before the service started at 6:30 a.m. (which is what happens when Easter lands in mid-April instead of late March).

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Losing a dog will be a big expense for owners

File photo Rocky, shown here, was a rescued dog. If he had been a stray, his owner would have paid a hefty fee to retrieve him.

File photo
Rocky, shown here, was a rescued dog. If he had been a stray, his owner would have paid a hefty fee to retrieve him.

It pays to know where your dog is, because the cost of retrieving a stray has skyrocketed. And it’s the owner who gets the bill.

There aren’t many loose canines in Cornwall, but one or two a month wind up in the Town of Woodbury Animal Shelter, which is raising its fee schedule in the New Year.

1. For a dog it receives during the work day, the shelter has raised its charge from $35 to $200.

2. For a dog that arrives after hours, the shelter is elevating its fee from $100 to $350.

And the dog owner can get socked with a penalty from the Town ($50-$100) for violating the leash law and a boarding fee of $25 a day if the dog is kept overnight.

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Kane gives library an historic painting

George Kane (right) gave the Cornwall Public Library a John Gould painting of the Forge Hill Bridge. With Mr. Kane (from left to right) are Paul and Bill Gould (sons of the artist) and library director Mary Lou Carolan.

George Kane (right) gave the Cornwall Public Library a John Gould painting of the Forge Hill Bridge. With Mr. Kane (from left to right) are Paul and Bill Gould (sons of the artist) and library director Mary Lou Carolan.

George Kane had just arrived at an estate sale when he spotted a John Gould painting of the old bridge on Forge Hill Road.

Remembering the bridge, Mr. Kane glanced at the print that had been signed by the artist. There was no haggling over price. Mr. Kane purchased the painting, and on Nov. 15 he donated it to the Cornwall Public Library along with a two-page description of the bridge’s history.

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Knights of Columbus guests early for annual meal

Nicholas Festa was one of several young servers at the Knights of Columbus Thanksgiving Dinner for senior citizens.

Nicholas Festa was one of several young servers at the Knights of Columbus Thanksgiving Dinner for senior citizens.

“There are people who’ve been sitting here since Monday,” one of the guests at the Knights of Columbus dinner quipped.

He was exaggerating, but the St. Thomas of Canterbury parking lot was full long before the official 12 o’clock start time for the annual feast.

The latecomers had to leave their cars at Village Hall. No one was turned away at the door, as the Knights treated 215 senior citizens to a turkey dinner with a large assortment of desserts.

Jim Lulves was the emcee for the day. With tongue in cheek, he cited three reasons for his selection. He’s big enough to be seen throughout the room. He’s good looking (“You should’ve seen me with hair,” he joked.) And the assignment keeps him away from the serving table.

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EDAC ideas should prompt discussion

The EDAC is propsing a pedestrian mall for the intersection of Main and Bridge Street.

The EDAC is propsing a pedestrian mall for the intersection of Main and Bridge Street.

“Don’t get caught up in the details,” Bill Braine suggested when he visited us last week. He was referring to his proposal to the Town Board on Nov. 7.

Speaking as the head of the Economic Development Advisory Committee (EDAC), Mr. Braine introduced a campaign, called “Cornwall Rising,” which would begin with an upgrade of Main Street.

After months of research and interviews, the committee suggested a pedestrian mall at the intersection of Bridge and Main Street, and a green area at either end of the business district.

The committee’s handout offered specifics, but  Mr. Braine was focused on a concept when he came to our office. “This was just a way to start the conversation,” he said of the proposal — “a way to get people thinking about what makes Cornwall special, and how we can invite more investment and commerce into the community.”

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Town Board OKs preliminary budget

The DEC has pushed back the dealine for Phase I of the upgrade of the Town’s sewage treatment plant.

The DEC has pushed back the deadline for Phase I of the upgrade of the Town’s sewage treatment plant.

At an Oct. 13 workshop, the Town Board accepted a preliminary budget that is under the tax levy cap. The board will hold a public hearing on the budget at 7 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 7. Copies are available in the Town Clerk’s office.

-In other news, the board extended COVAC’s contract until the end of the year. The supervisor and deputy supervisor had submitted a proposal to the ambulance corps, where it would become independent on June 1, 2017.

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Hunters aim to thwart zombie take-over

Photo by Jay LeRoy The third annual zombie walk will take place at the Cornwall Volunteer Ambulance Corps bay. Hunters will try to “capture” the zombies attempting to take over the town.

Photo by Jay LeRoy
The third annual zombie walk will take place at the Cornwall Volunteer Ambulance Corps bay. Hunters will try to “capture” the zombies attempting to take over the town.

The zombie invasion is coming to Cornwall – again. The undead have rallied their troops in preparation for another takeover attempt and it will once again be up to the hunters to save the town from peril.

On Oct. 22, from 5 to 9 p.m., Cornwall High School student Abigail Moore will conduct her third annual zombie event.

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Local candidates each win a primary

Lisa LaGrutta (right) showed up at Munger Cottage to see if she was eligible to vote in the Sept. 13 primary.

Lisa LaGrutta (right) showed up at Munger Cottage to see if she was eligible to vote in the Sept. 13 primary.

Michael O’Connor and incumbent Lynn Beesecker each picked up a line in their race for Town Justice.

Mr. O’Connor won the Conservative primary 17-13, while Judge Beesecker prevailed in the Independence Party race 30-27.

With a small turnout expected, Munger Cottage was the only polling site in Cornwall. About half the people who showed up there weren’t eligible to vote in the Sept. 13 primary, which was limited to members of the Conservative, Independence, Green, Working Family and Women’s Equality Parties.

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Patriot Day speakers avoid repetition

Representatives of Gym Kids placed a wreath at the Ken Kumpel 9-11 Monument at Chadeayne Circle.

Representatives of Gym Kids placed a wreath at the Ken Kumpel 9-11 Monument at Chadeayne Circle.

Another large crowd showed up for the Patriots Day observance at Chadeayne Circle. The challenge for the speakers was to be relevant without repeating what they had said in the past.

That wasn’t a problem for Susan Kamlet. The president of the historical society was addressing the gathering for the first time. As a young adult, she had witnessed history through the eyes of her grandfather, who remembered the Wright Brothers’ flight and Lindbergh’s crossing the Atlantic.

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