Reuse. Recycle. Repurpose. Recreate.

Apr7_collageBack in 1980, a young Morten Ender lived in Germany but was planning to visit friends in Naples, Italy. In preparing to head there, his friends said they’d be spending the summer on the islands in the Mediterranean selling arts and crafts to tourists, and he should go with them.

“I said I don’t make anything,” Ender recalled this week, noting that he was aware that Europeans encourage the making of arts and crafts. “But, I pressed some flowers and took them, and they sold!”

That encouraged him, once he was back home in Germany, to keep making simple collages of pressed flowers and selling them at local craft fairs for extra money.

“The Germans seemed to love them,” he says.

Fast forward to 2017. Ender, a professor at West Point, is a 20-year resident of Highland Falls. He’s an accomplished author — his seventh book, with Dr. Michael Matthews from Cornwall, is about diversity and inclusion in the military and will be released next month. He and his wife Corina, a Social Studies teacher at Ketcham High School in Dutchess County, have one son, Axel, who is a soccer player and Fashion and Business Studies major at Marist College.

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Artist tells stories through collages

Photo by Jason Kaplan Alaina Enslan began creating narrative collages while studying at the University of Montevallo. This self portrait was part of her final project toward her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree.

Photo by Jason Kaplan
Alaina Enslan began creating narrative collages while studying at the University of Montevallo. This self portrait was part of her final project toward her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree.

Alaina Enslan’s earliest memory with art was having to draw a still-life in second or third grade. Placed before her were vases of flowers, shoes, books, a skull, and a bunch of knick-knacks. At first she didn’t think she would enjoy drawing the objects, but once she started, she couldn’t stop.

“It was one of those moments that clicked,” said Enslan, a two-year resident of Cornwall-on-Hudson. “I could have sat there and drawn the rest of the school day. I was just fascinated with the simplicity of just drawing the lines of the work and the shading and being able to take something three dimensional and put it in two dimensions. Art was really my first language. It was easier for me to express myself visually. I just kept with it. It was easy for me. It made me feel alive. It helped me connect and understand the world around me.”

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Murray masters multiple media

Photos by Jason Kaplan Murray will unveil his latest creation, a carved sculpture titled “She is...,” at the Grail’s 50th anniversary celebration the first weekend in November.

Photos by Jason Kaplan
Murray will unveil his latest creation, a carved sculpture titled “She is…,” at the Grail’s 50th anniversary celebration the first weekend in November.

Terry Murray, a 30-year resident of Cornwall, is an eclectic artist. He doesn’t stick to one medium like many other artists, but rather he lets his inspiration dictate what medium he uses for a particular project. Over the last 12 years, Murray has used Photoshop to create a collage of images, acrylic paints, carved and cut wood, as well as stones.

“I am a former art teacher and over the decades have used my creative abilities on a range of projects, so I am not a one-media artist.”

Murray holds a Bachelor’s Degree in art education and a Master’s Degree in humanistic education from SUNY New Paltz. He earned his PhD in curriculum and instruction from SUNY Albany.

He began his career as a public school art teacher, serving one year in the Newburgh Enlarged City School District and another in the Dunkirk City School District. He spent the next 16 years as a YMCA camp director in Newburgh and Frost Valley. He was a graphic designer for 10 years, working with school districts, not-for-profit organizations, Mohonk Preserve, St. Luke’s Hospital, and Black Rock Fish and Game Club. For the last 22 years he’s worked as an associate professor in the Education Studies Department in the School of Education at SUNY New Paltz.

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Photos capture hungry and oppressed

Photo by Jason Kaplan Mary Ann G. Neuman’s favorite photo, titled “The Eavesdropper,’” was taken in Poland. The photo, a study of people and animals, depicts a cat watching as two women talk under the billboard.

Photo by Jason Kaplan
Mary Ann G. Neuman’s favorite photo, titled “The Eavesdropper,’” was taken in Poland. The photo, a study of people and animals, depicts a cat watching as two women talk under the billboard.

While some photographers shoot weddings, landscapes, or wild animals, Cornwall-on-Hudson resident Mary Ann G. Neuman specializes in photographing humanity.

“It was just a way to record life and all of its forms,” she said. “I’ve always had attentiveness for the poor and disadvantaged of the world. On some level I thought if I could record it, it would create awareness.”

Much of Neuman’s work highlights what women (and men) in our culture, and in other cultures, live with as far as poverty and oppression. In some countries, Neuman said, women are reduced to begging because their husbands have died and they have no means of support.

In her gallery shows, Neuman has made it her mission to bring that misfortune to light. Her ongoing body of work titled “Somebody’s Sister,” portrays the plight of women all over the world. Neuman has amassed an extensive body of work on the Island of Vieques, Puerto Rico covering a span of 12 years. The images depict the island’s struggle to stop the military training exercises and bombings on the island.

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