Zoning Board asked if dog service is a kennel

Lori Ransom, Arlene Roberts and Eileen Regan of the ZBA examine a map of the property surrounding Valentina Quinn’s house.

Lori Ransom, Arlene Roberts and Eileen Regan of the ZBA examine a map of the property surrounding Valentina Quinn’s house.

The Town Zoning Board heard a different type of appeal on Nov. 20. Normally, the board is concerned with measurements. A homeowner will ask for a variance when a proposed addition leaves less than the required space at the rear or side of the property.

But the request on Nov. 20 was different. A property owner asked for a definition. Was she merely walking dogs or was she operating a kennel? If  the ZBA determined that she was running a kennel, she would either have to desist or apply for a variance — since she had considerably less than the five acres the zoning ordinance would require.

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This week’s issue – December 8, 2017

Dec8_referendum

Photo by Ken Cashman At the end of the referendum at the middle school, Neal Miller, Harvey, Sotland, Larry Berger, and Ray Torraca waited to get a tally from the voting machines. The proposal was voted down 1,313 to 706.

Voters turn down capital project

The post mortem for the school district’s capital improvement plan was brief and to the point. Board of Education President Larry Berger delivered the news in the middle school gym shortly after 9 o’clock on Dec. 5.

Mr. Berger was stoic when he made his announcement. “There were 706 yes votes,” he said, “and 1.313 no’s.” Then, feeling the need to say something else, he added the obvious — “It didn’t pass.” Page 1A

Board isn’t winding down for holidays

There are reasons to look forward to 2018. Central Hudson plans to replace the poles on Main Street, and the Town expects to extend the Little League driveway so it reaches the softball and tee ball fields. Handicapped fans, and other pedestrians, will no longer have to hike up the hill to watch a game.

Local officials won’t have to wait for the New Year to get some positive news. At the Dec. 11 Town Board meeting, the Town will get a certificate of excellence from the State Office of Real Property, which was happy with the results of Cornwall’s revaluation. Page 1A

ACE program attracts high school students

When Walter Moran, the school district’s Director of Buildings and Grounds, introduced the ACE Program to Cornwall he wasn’t sure if he’d get 15 high school students to participate. The response was so overwhelming Moran opened up 15 more slots and still had to turn away 10 students interested in a career in architecture, construction, or engineering. Page 1A

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Accident shuts down Route 32

Route 32 is expected to be closed for up to four hours, according to the Department of Transportation. At approximately 2:30 p.m., a two-vehicle accident shut down the state road, in both directions, near Ardmore Street. According to New York State Police, the three occupants suffered unknown injuries, but reported no fatalities. Vails Gate Fire Department, New Windsor Police Department, Cornwall Police Department, New Windsor Ambulance Corps, and Cornwall Volunteer Ambulance Corps also responded to the scene.

Sands Ring Homestead opens for Shop Hop

 Eileen Tulloch and Colleen Zlock wrap ribbon around some garland as they decorate Sands Ring Homestead for the holiday season.

Eileen Tulloch and Colleen Zlock wrap ribbon around some garland as they decorate Sands Ring Homestead for the holiday season.

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas – inside Sands Ring Homestead anyway. Members of the Cornwall Historical Society and the Friends of Sands Ring were busy decorating the homestead, on Monday, in preparation for this Saturday’s Shop Hop and the upcoming holiday tours on Dec. 3.

The two organizations joined forces to adorn the tables, windows, and fireplaces with scented candles, fruit, ribbons, and long pine needles to make the homestead look like a 1760 Quaker home during the holidays.

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Historic book donated to Village’s museum

Contributed photo Village historian Kathleen Christensen with Nathaniel Stillman, who donated his family’s genealogical book to the museum at Village Hall.

Contributed photo
Village historian Kathleen Christensen with Nathaniel Stillman, who donated his family’s genealogical book to the museum at Village Hall.

The museum at Village Hall recently acquired a genealogical book that belonged to the Stillman family. The acquisition was a gift from Nathaniel Stillman, a former Cornwall-on-Hudson resident.

Village Historian Kathleen Christensen reports that the book includes documentation, pictures and a family chart that dates back to the birth of Charles Stillman in 1810.

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Black Rock group goes behind the scenes

Contributed photos Christopher Raxworthy (right), a conservation biologist, at the Museum of Natural History led a family group on a behind the scenes tour of the museum.

Contributed photos
Christopher Raxworthy (right), a conservation biologist, at the Museum of Natural History led a family group on a behind the scenes tour of the museum.

It’s Friday the 13th, just a few weeks before Halloween. You’re planning the first outing for a new group that includes kids and their parents. Where would you take them — a horror movie, a haunted house? How about going behind the scenes at the Museum of Natural History! What could be spookier than a well-preserved reptile or amphibian!

The new group is the Parents Committee of the Black Rock Forest Consortium. It’s open to families with youngsters between the ages of 5 and 17. It’s goal is to use the consortium’s resources (including the forest) to advance scientific understanding of the natural world.

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Hospital to offer open access primary care

 

After this morning's press conference, hospital CEO Joan Cusack-McGuirk answers questions from Mike Randall of the Times Herald-Record.

After this morning’s press conference, hospital CEO Joan Cusack-McGuirk answered questions from Mike Randall of the Times Herald-Record.

It’s called “open access primary care.” Patients can walk in the door or make an appointment with a doctor. The service will be available at the Cornwall Campus of the hospital in about a year.

Hospital CEO Joan Cusack-McGuirk and Assemblyman James Skoufis broke the news at a press conference on the campus this morning. Mrs. Cusack-McGuirk said it would take a year to finalize the financial plans and implement the architectural design. Once that’s done, the primary care center will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Monday through Saturday, and from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday.

In the meantime, Burke Rehabilitation will be extending its medical center in the hospital building. “We’re very proud to become part of this vision,” Jeff Menkes of Burke remarked when it was his turn at the microphone.

A year ago, the hospital announced it was closing the emergency room in Cornwall. Mrs. Cusack-McGuirk alluded to that in her opening remarks. “This is a nicer day than last time,” she said.

The Assemblyman lauded the change that came about after almost nine months of meetings. He said that the Assembly Speaker had supported the move. “We’re changing the trajectory of the C0rnwall campus,” Mr. Skoufis remarked. “Today is a turning point.”

Town Board members and candidates were at the conference. Supervisor Richard Randazzo was among the first to speak when it was time for questions. “We should be optimistic,” he said. “Thank you on behalf of the community. This is a giant leap forward.”