Professor recalls childhood eclipse experience

During an Aug. 14 visit to the Cornwall Public Library, Prof. David Kashinski held models of the moon and sun. He explained that the two objects appear to be the same size, because the moon is so much closer to the Earth.

During an Aug. 14 visit to the Cornwall Public Library, Prof. David Kashinski held models of the moon and sun. He explained that the two objects appear to be the same size, because the moon is so much closer to the Earth.

Dr. David Kashinski is a professor of physics at West Point. When he was eight years old he viewed an eclipse without any protective glasses. That night he experienced the traditional symptoms — light sensitivity, watery eyes, blurred vision.

It didn’t take long for his father to figure out what was wrong. Being a welder, he was familiar with “the flash” — the visual problems caused by a sudden exposure to bright light. He brought David to the doctor and within a day or two the youngster was fine.

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Boys State intimidating but worthwhile

Photo contributed Boys State participants learned how to eat quickly. Meals were limited to 15 minutes.

Photo contributed
Boys State participants learned how to eat quickly. Meals were limited to 15 minutes.

Cornwall American Legion Post 353 sent eight teens to this year’s Boys State, an educational program designed to teach participants discipline and how the government operates. This year’s attendees were Adam Johnson, Eliot Perez, Patrick Vilda, Justin Gagnon, Lucas Arora, Sam Delacruz, Zachary Denning, and Erik Fosstveit. The program was held June 25 to July 1 at SUNY Morrisville.

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This week’s issue – August 18, 2017

“I would encourage anything that could modernize our school,” Dominic Cordisco of Cornwall-on-Hudson told the school board on Aug. 14. Architect David Sammel is seated in the front row of the high school auditorium.

“I would encourage anything that could modernize our school,” Dominic Cordisco of Cornwall-on-Hudson told the school board on Aug. 14. .

Miller suggests facility plan cuts

In a single sentence, Neal Miller summed up the dilemma with the district’s facilities plan. “We can do anything,” the superintendent of schools said, “but we can’t do everything.”

He listed his priorities at the Aug. 14 school board meeting — identifying the parts of the plan he would keep or cut. When he was finished, he did the arithmetic and the estimated cost, $56.1 million, was still too high. He’s hoping to get it down to $40 to $50 million. Page 1

Cornwall’s heard at KJ hearing

A seasoned poker player would have had trouble reading the county legislators as they sat on the stage at Central Valley School and listened to the arguments for and against the creation of a new town.

The decision is in their hands. If they allow a referendum, the voters in Monroe are sure to approve the Town of Palm Tree, which will include Kiryas Joel plus an additional 220 acres.

The audience and the speakers at the Aug. 15 public hearing were divided geographically. Most, but not all of the Monroe residents, asked the legislators to vote yes. Page 1

New rescue boat needs engine

Storm King Engine Company is facing a major expense as funds are being reallocated in the budget to purchase a new engine for its boat. The 14-year-old rescue boat was purchased from the City of Newburgh Police Department last year. According to assistant chief Mike Trainor, the cost of a used, re-manufactured engine would be about $7,000. He received two quotes for a new engine – $12,900 for one in Virginia and $15,200 for another in Kingston. The latter includes assembly parts for the throttle and shift cables. Page 1

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Cast overcomes ‘Addams Family’ gloom

Director T.J. Larke stands in to rehearse a scene with Raymond Capuzzi. Capuzzi, who plays Pugsley in “The Addams Family,” enjoyed being tortured on the rack.

Director T.J. Larke stands in to rehearse a scene with Raymond Capuzzi. Capuzzi, who plays Pugsley in “The Addams Family,” enjoyed being tortured on the rack.

The Addams family is described as creepy, kooky, mysterious, and spooky, so it only seems appropriate for the Step it up Summer Stage production of the musical comedy to have been met with doom and gloom since the beginning of the two-week program.

Benjamin Kohn was originally slated to serve as musical director for the 5 to 18-year-old thespians. Unfortunately, director Karen Eremin explained, Kohn was in a car accident the Thursday before auditions. He injured his wrists and suffered a concussion rendering him unable to perform his duties.

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Century-old Teddy Bear inspires kids’ book

Robert and Loretta Gould with the sketches that inspired a children’s book. Mrs. Gould named the central character Barnaby Benjamin Bear.

Robert and Loretta Gould with the sketches that inspired a children’s book. Mrs. Gould named the central character Barnaby Benjamin Bear.

John Gould (1906-96) was a prominent illustrator for The Saturday Evening Post and several national corporations. But he also sketched for fun. And one of his lighter creations has inspired a children’s book by a daughter-in-law he never met.

Mr. Gould was always sketching. When out for dinner, he might decorate a Styrofoam take-out box with portraits of the patrons  around him. Or, if he was in a playful mood, he might draw a spider on a paper table cloth and call for the waitress.

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The summer months fly by as camp seasons end

Photo by Jason Kaplan Village campers Ethan Greenblatt, Landon Lavallee, and Noah Chyla palaver while eating lunch.

Photo by Jason Kaplan
Village campers Ethan Greenblatt, Landon Lavallee, and Noah Chyla palaver while eating lunch.

Nearly 240 children attended summer camp in the town and village this year. Unfortunately, their season of fun came to an end this week.

Both camps featured a number of trips including visits to Splashdown, Tarsio Lanes, and the firemen’s fair.  It remained cloudy, but warm, when the town campers went to Splashdown, but the village campers had a little bit of help getting wet from Mother Nature – it rained half the day.

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“Men Can Cook”: Seniors learn to prepare meals

The Orange County Office for the Aging recently completed a six-week class which taught senior men how to prepare simple meals

The Orange County Office for the Aging recently completed a six-week class which taught senior men how to prepare simple meals

Cooking aficionados might remember “Yan Can Cook” back in the 1980s. The Orange County Office for the Aging recently completed its own version of the cooking show, “Men Can Cook,” held at Munger Cottage. The six-week program was only open to male senior citizens.

“We decided to take men for the program because traditionally their wives would cook for them,” said nutrition program director Kevin Monaghan. “One of the things that qualify men for the program is their spouse may have cooked for them their entire life and now their spouse is sick, passed on and they don’t know how to cook and can’t fend for themselves. They end up eating TV dinners and prepared foods. We wanted to take a group of men and teach them some basic cooking skills and show them some dishes they may not have been exposed to in the past.”

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Gregorek finds relation between arts and athletics

Lawrence Gregorek

Lawrence Gregorek

Growing up, Lawrence Gregorek never let cliques define who he was or prevent him from participating in the activities he enjoyed. As a 2006 Cornwall graduate, Gregorek was in the unique position of being able to express himself as both an athlete and an artist.

Gregorek was quarterback of the football team, but he also played baseball and was a member of the swimming and diving team. He’d practice like any other athlete, but then he’d hit the art room to work on a project. He often fielded questions from both cliques – are you really an athlete/artist? – but everyone accepted him for who he was. Ever since he was a kid, he had an interest in both arts and athletics.

“I’ve always been an adventurous person and I love sports,” Gregorek said. “I think everyone knew that growing up. I was always outside, running around.”

Gregorek also learned he had the ability to see certain things.

“If there’s a blank canvas, I’m able to see the image before I paint. I enjoy being expressive. Art was just another way for me to express my love with color, composition, and design. Drawing and painting gave me an outlet and I was pretty good at it. I wanted to continue with it and see where art could take me.”

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Senator Larkin still likes to share good news

July28_larkinAfter almost 40 years in the state legislature, Sen. Bill Larkin still likes to share good news. So when he was able to secure a $40,000 grant for the Cornwall-on-Hudson Police Department, the senator picked up the phone and called the chief.

“Are you sitting down?” Mr. Larkin asked before he identified himself. As a matter of fact, Chief Steve Dixon was sitting down. He was driving to work on Route 207 — not far from the senator’s office. “Is it all right if I stop in?” the chief asked.

A few minutes later, he came through the door and shook hands with his benefactor. “We’ve been trying to upgrade our equipment,” the chief said, “and this is going to be a major addition.”

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